PIE Methodology

Terms and Conditions

You and the company or business that you are authorized to represent (“you,” “your,” or “Company”) agree to these Tribal Blast Business Terms of Service and all other applicable terms, policies, and documentation (collectively, “Business Terms”) by downloading or using Tribal Blast’s apps, software, features, services, and APIs designed and developed for businesses (“Business Services”).

Tribal Blast Inc. is the contracting entity providing you our Business Services, unless you are in a country in the European Economic Area and any other included country or territory in which case Tribal Blast Ireland Limited is the contracting entity providing you our Business Services (collectively, “Tribal Blast,” “our,” “we,” or “us”). We provide our Business Services solely for your business or commercial use.

NO ACCESS TO EMERGENCY SERVICES. Please note important differences between our Business Services and mobile phone, fixed-line telephone, or SMS services. Our Business Services do not provide access to emergency services or emergency services providers, including the police, fire departments, or hospitals, or otherwise connect to public safety answering points. Company should ensure that it can contact its relevant emergency services providers through a mobile phone, fixed-line telephone, or other service.

Additional Terms and Policies

These Business Terms incorporate by reference the following policies and documents:

TBD

 

To the extent that any of the additional terms and policies conflict with these Business Terms, the additional terms and policies will govern.

Tribal Blast Business Account

Business Use and Eligibility. You represent and warrant that you: (a) will use our Business Services solely for business, commercial, and authorized purposes, and not for personal use; (b) will only provide registration information associated with your Company; (c) are authorized to enter into these Business Terms and are at least 18 years old (or the age of majority in your country of residence); and (d) have not been previously suspended or removed from our Business Services, or engaged in any activity that could result in suspension or removal.

Registration and Account. Company must create a Tribal Blast business account by providing accurate, current, and complete information, including its valid legal business phone number, Company name, and other information we require. Company will keep its business account information updated. Company’s name must not: (a) be false, misleading, deceptive, or defamatory; (b) parody a third party or include character symbols, excessive punctuation, or trademark designations; or (c) infringe any trademark, violate any right of publicity, or otherwise violate anyone’s rights. We reserve the right to reclaim account names on behalf of any business or individual that holds legal claim in those names.

Communication Preferences. As part of your relationship with us, you permit Tribal Blast to use your information to send you electronic communications (such as messages, emails, and phone calls via Tribal Blast or otherwise) from us or our third-party providers, including: (a) notices about your account, password changes, payment authorizations, and other transactional information; and (b) information about products, services, surveys, events, news, and promotions offered by Tribal Blast or the  where permitted by applicable law. If you do not wish for Tribal Blast to communicate with you in regard to (b) above, you may opt-out of future communications by contacting Tribal Blast at the contact specified at the end of these terms, or by clicking the “unsubscribe” link in any such communication.

Devices and Software. You must provide certain devices, software, and data connections, which we do not otherwise supply, to use our Business Services. You consent to manually or automatically download and install updates to our Business Services.

Fees and Taxes. You are responsible for all carrier data plans, Internet fees, and other fees and taxes associated with your use of our Business Services.

Linking to Facebook. To use all or certain features of our Business Services, we may require Company to link its Tribal Blast business account with the Facebook account used for its business. Facebook’s terms and policies apply to the extent that you use Facebook’s services.

Third-Party Services. Our Business Services may allow Company to access, use, or interact with websites, apps, content, and other products and services that are not provided by Tribal Blast. For example, Company may choose to use third-party data backup services (such as iCloud or Google Drive) that may be used with some of our Business Services. Please note that when Company uses these other services, their own terms and privacy policies will govern Company’s use of those services. Tribal Blast will not be responsible or liable for your use of those services, the third-party’s terms, or any actions you take under the third-party’s terms.

Company’s Legal, Privacy, and Security Responsibilities

Compliance with Laws and Regulations. You may only use our Business Services if you have ensured that your use of our Business Services complies with all legal and regulatory requirements; it is your sole responsibility to determine your legal obligations. Our Business Services are not intended for intracorporate usage. We make no representations or warranties that our Business Services meet the needs of entities regulated by laws and regulations with heightened confidentiality requirements for personal data, such as healthcare, financial, or legal services entities. Company must provide all necessary data disclosures and notices (such as maintaining a privacy policy or labelling marketing messages). Company must also secure all necessary rights, consents, and permissions (for example, opt-in) to share its customers’ contact and other personal data with Tribal Blast, and to communicate with its customers via Tribal Blast using this information. Tribal Blast is not liable for any acts or omissions by Company that breach any applicable laws. Company must also honor and comply with all Tribal Blast user requests to stop or opt-out of receiving certain or all types of Tribal Blast messages from Company. Tribal Blast users may block Company, mark Company’s messages as spam, or notify us that Company is otherwise violating our terms and policies. Tribal Blast will then take appropriate action, which could result in Tribal Blast suspending or terminating Company’s use of our Business Services.

Security Responsibilities. Company may only allow authorized individuals acting on behalf of Company to access and use its Tribal Blast business account for purposes authorized under these Business Terms. Company is responsible for all activities occurring under its account. Company must: (a) maintain the security of its account credentials; (b) keep its devices and Tribal Blast account safe and secure; (c) prevent unauthorized use of or access to our Business Services; and (d) immediately notify us if Company discovers or suspects any security breaches related to our Business Services or if Company discovers or suspects any such unauthorized access or use. Company will implement and follow generally recognized industry standards and best practices for data and information security to protect Company’s data, network, and systems from unauthorized access, use, or copying. Company must promptly delete any user’s information it obtained via our Business Services if we determine, in our reasonable discretion, that Company breached its obligation to protect and prevent unauthorized use or access to its devices, account, or systems, breached these Business Terms, or if these Business Terms are terminated for any reason.

Licenses and Intellectual Property

Company License to Us. Our Business Services enable you to create, post, store, send, and receive content, such as text, images, videos, and other materials, including Company’s trademarks, logos, slogans, and other proprietary materials (collectively, “Company Content”). You grant Tribal Blast and its subsidiaries and affiliates a worldwide, non-exclusive, sub-licensable, and transferable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, and publicly perform or display Company Content that you upload, submit, store, send, or receive on or through our Business Services, solely for the purposes of providing, operating, developing, promoting, updating, and improving our Business Services, and researching and developing new services, features, or uses. You represent and warrant that you have all rights necessary to grant us the license to Company Content, and that our use of it, as permitted by these Business Terms, will not violate any right of, or cause injury to, any person or entity.

Company’s Rights. Except for the license you grant to us above, you retain all ownership and other rights in and to your Company Content.

Our License to Company. Subject to your compliance with these Business Terms, we grant you a limited, revocable, non-exclusive, non-sublicensable, and non-transferable license to use our Business Services solely as authorized in these Business Terms. You may also use our trademarks to promote that your business is on Tribal Blast, solely as set forth in our Tribal Blast Brand Guidelines

 

Tribal Blast’s Rights. Except for the express license grant in these Business Terms, we grant no other licenses or rights to Company by implication or otherwise. Unless otherwise indicated, we own all copyrights, trademarks, domains, logos, trade dress, trade secrets, patents, and other intellectual property rights associated with our Business Services.

 

Restrictions. Except as otherwise permitted by Tribal Blast in writing, Company must not directly, indirectly, or through automated or other means: (a) distribute, sell, resell, or rent our Business Services to third parties; (b) distribute or make our Business Services available over a network to be used by multiple devices at the same time, except as authorized through tools and configurations that we have expressly provided for your use via our Business Services; and (c) copy, reproduce, distribute, publicly perform or display, modify, or make derivative works based upon all or portions of our Business Services. Company must not directly, indirectly, or through automated or other means: (d) remove any proprietary rights notices or markings; (e) reverse engineer any aspect of our Business Services or do anything that may discover source code; (f) scrape or extract data from our Business Services; (g) develop or use any applications that interact with our Business Services without our prior written consent; and (h) create software or APIs that function substantially the same as our Business Services and offer them for use by third parties in an unauthorized manner.

Reporting Third-Party Copyright, Trademark, and Other Intellectual Property Infringement. To report claims of third-party copyright, trademark, or other intellectual property infringement, please visit our Tribal Blast Intellectual Property . If you infringe the intellectual property rights of others, we may take action with respect to your account, including disabling or suspending your account.

Feedback. We always appreciate your feedback or other suggestions about Tribal Blast. You agree that any questions, comments, suggestions, ideas, original or creative materials, or other information about Tribal Blast or our products or services that you post, submit, or otherwise communicate to us (collectively, “Feedback”) is non-confidential and that we will be entitled to the unrestricted use and dissemination of Feedback for any purpose, commercial or otherwise, without acknowledgment or compensation to you.

Acceptable Use of our Business Services

Acceptable Use. Company will not (nor assist others to) violate any applicable law, contract, intellectual property, or other third-party right, and Company is solely responsible for its conduct while using our Business Services. Company must not directly, indirectly, or through automated or other means: (a) use our Business Services for personal, family, or household purposes; (b) engage in any harassing, threatening, intimidating, predatory, or stalking conduct; (c) use or attempt to use another user’s account without prior authorization from that user and Tribal Blast; (d) impersonate or register on behalf of any person or entity or otherwise misrepresent your affiliation with a person or entity, perpetrate fraud, or publish falsehoods or misleading statements; (e) collect information of or about other users in any impermissible or unauthorized manner; (f) use our Business Services other than for their intended purpose or interfere with, disrupt, negatively affect, or inhibit other users; (g) damage, disable, overburden, or impair our Business Services; (h) send, distribute, or post spam, unsolicited electronic communications, chain letters, pyramid schemes, or illegal or impermissible communications; (i) post, upload, or share any content which is unlawful, libelous, defamatory, obscene, pornographic, indecent, lewd, suggestive, harassing, threatening, invasive of privacy or publicity rights, abusive, inflammatory, fraudulent, or is in our sole judgment objectionable; (j) encourage or provide instructions for a criminal offense; (k) distribute any viruses, corrupted data, or other harmful, disruptive, or destructive files or content; (l) bypass, ignore, or circumvent instructions in our robots.txt file or any measures we employ to prevent or limit access to any part of our Business Services, including content-filtering techniques; or (m) expose Tribal Blast or others to any type of harm or liability.

Enforcement. Although we have no obligation to screen or monitor Company Content, we may review, remove, or delete Company Content posted and shared by you at any time, at our discretion, and without notice, such as in cases where other users notify us that Company Content violates these Business Terms. If we disable or terminate Company’s account for a violation of these Business Terms, Company will not create another Tribal Blast business account without our express written permission.

Our Data Practices

Your Customer Contacts. Company provides customer contact information such as phone numbers (“Customer Data”) to Tribal Blast, and Company determines which of its customers it may communicate with using Tribal Blast. To the extent your customers are located in the and the General Data Protection Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2016/679) (“GDPR”) applies to your processing of any Personal Data (as that term is defined in the GDPR) contained within Customer Data, you are the data controller selecting the message recipients and instructing Tribal Blast, for the duration of these Business Terms, to process such Personal Data on your behalf as your data processor pursuant to these Business Terms to deliver Company’s messages to its customers. To the extent that we process such Personal Data within Customer Data as your processor, our XX apply and are incorporated by reference into these Business Terms.

Other Information. You understand and agree that Tribal Blast collects, stores, and uses: (a) information from your business account and registration; (b) usage, log, and functional information generated from your use of our Business Services; (c) performance, diagnostics, and analytics information; (d) information related to your technical or other support requests; and (e) information about you from other sources such as other Tribal Blast users, businesses, third-party companies, and the Facebook Companies. We may share this information with the Facebook Companies, and we and the Facebook Companies will use all the information we have to develop, operate, provide, improve, understand, customize, support, and market our Business Services, our other services, and the services and products of the Facebook Companies.

Our Global Operations. Company agrees to the transfer and processing of information that we collect, store, and use under these Business Terms, to the United States and other countries globally where we have or use facilities, service providers, or partners, regardless of where you use our Business Services. You acknowledge that the laws, regulations, and standards of the country in which your information is stored or processed may be different from those of your own country.

Legal Disclosures and Third-Party Requests. You agree that Tribal Blast may share your information, including Company Content, if we have good-faith belief that it is reasonably necessary to: (a) respond pursuant to applicable law or regulations, legal processes, or government requests; (b) enforce these Business Terms and any other applicable terms and policies, including for investigations of potential violations; (c) detect, investigate, prevent, and address fraud and other illegal activity, or security or technical issues; or (d) protect the rights, property, and safety of our users, Tribal Blast, the Facebook Companies, or others.

Availability

Our Business Services may be interrupted, including for maintenance, repairs, upgrades, or network or equipment failures. We may discontinue some or all of our Business Services, including certain features and the support for certain devices and platforms, at any time. Events beyond our control may affect our Business Services, such as events in nature and other force majeure events.

Disclaimer

COMPANY USES OUR BUSINESS SERVICES AT ITS OWN RISK AND SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMERS. WE ARE PROVIDING OUR BUSINESS SERVICES ON AN “AS IS” BASIS WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, TITLE, NON-INFRINGEMENT, AND FREEDOM FROM COMPUTER VIRUS OR OTHER HARMFUL CODE. WE DO NOT WARRANT THAT ANY INFORMATION PROVIDED BY US IS ACCURATE, COMPLETE, OR USEFUL; THAT OUR BUSINESS SERVICES OR ANY OTHER SERVICES WILL BE OPERATIONAL, ERROR FREE, SECURE, OR SAFE; OR THAT OUR BUSINESS SERVICES OR ANY OTHER SERVICES WILL FUNCTION WITHOUT DISRUPTIONS, DELAYS, OR IMPERFECTIONS. WE DO NOT CONTROL, AND ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR CONTROLLING, HOW OR WHEN OUR USERS USE OUR BUSINESS SERVICES OR OTHER SERVICES, OR THE FEATURES, FUNCTIONALITIES, AND INTERFACES OUR BUSINESS SERVICES OR OTHER SERVICES PROVIDE. WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR AND ARE NOT OBLIGATED TO CONTROL THE ACTIONS OR INFORMATION (INCLUDING CONTENT) OF OUR USERS OR OTHER THIRD PARTIES. THIS SECTION IS WITHOUT PREJUDICE TO OUR OBLIGATIONS AS A DATA PROCESSOR UNDER THE ,,,

Limitation of Liability

WE WILL NOT BE LIABLE TO COMPANY FOR ANY LOST PROFITS OR CONSEQUENTIAL, SPECIAL, PUNITIVE, INDIRECT, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES RELATING TO, ARISING OUT OF, OR IN ANY WAY IN CONNECTION WITH THESE BUSINESS TERMS, US, OR OUR BUSINESS SERVICES, EVEN IF WE HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. OUR AGGREGATE LIABILITY RELATING TO, ARISING OUT OF, OR IN ANY WAY IN CONNECTION WITH THESE BUSINESS TERMS, US, OR OUR BUSINESS SERVICES WILL NOT EXCEED THE GREATER OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($100) OR THE AMOUNT COMPANY HAS PAID US IN THE PAST TWELVE MONTHS TO USE OUR BUSINESS SERVICES. THE FOREGOING DISCLAIMER OF CERTAIN DAMAGES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY WILL APPLY TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. THE LAWS OF SOME STATES OR JURISDICTIONS MAY NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF CERTAIN DAMAGES, SO SOME OR ALL OF THE EXCLUSIONS AND LIMITATIONS SET FORTH ABOVE MAY NOT APPLY TO COMPANY. NOTWITHSTANDING ANYTHING TO THE CONTRARY IN THESE BUSINESS TERMS, IN SUCH CASES, THE LIABILITY OF TRIBAL BLAST AND ITS DIRECTORS, OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES, AFFILIATES, AND AGENTS (“TRIBAL BLAST PARTIES”) WILL BE LIMITED TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. IF YOU ARE A CALIFORNIA RESIDENT, YOU AGREE TO WAIVE CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE § 1542, WHICH SAYS: A GENERAL RELEASE DOES NOT EXTEND TO CLAIMS WHICH THE CREDITOR DOES NOT KNOW OR SUSPECT TO EXIST IN HIS OR HER FAVOR AT THE TIME OF EXECUTING THE RELEASE, WHICH IF KNOWN BY HIM OR HER MUST HAVE MATERIALLY AFFECTED HIS OR HER SETTLEMENT WITH THE DEBTOR.

Indemnification

Company agrees to defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the Tribal Blast Parties from and against all liabilities, damages, losses, and expenses of any kind (including reasonable legal fees and costs) relating to, arising out of, or in any way in connection with any of the following (“Claim”): (a) Company’s access to or use of our Business Services, including information provided in connection therewith; (b) Company’s breach or alleged breach of these Business Terms or applicable law; and (c) any misrepresentation made by Company. We have the right to solely control, and Company will cooperate as fully as required by us in, the defense or settlement of any Claim.

Modifying and Terminating our Business Services

We may modify, suspend, or terminate Company’s access to or use of our Business Services and these Business Terms at any time for any reason, including if we determine, in our sole discretion, that Company violates these Business Terms, receives excessive negative feedback, or creates harm, risk, or possible legal exposure for us, our users, or others. Company may terminate these Business Terms at any time for any reason by providing us written notice. Upon termination of these Business Terms for any reason, Company must promptly discontinue all use of our Business Services, uninstall and destroy all copies of software provided by Tribal Blast, and delete any user information Company obtained from using our Business Services. The following provisions will survive the termination of these Business Terms: Third-Party Services, Company’s Rights, Tribal Blast’s Rights, Feedback, Availability, Disclaimer, Limitation of Liability, Indemnification, Modifying and Terminating our Business Services, Tribal Blast Confidential Information, Publicity, Legal Compliance, Governing Law and Venue, Amendment, Assignment, Severability, Miscellaneous, and Notices.

Tribal Blast Confidential Information

Our communications with Company may contain Tribal Blast confidential information. Tribal Blast confidential information includes any of our materials, communications, and information that we provide to you or Company that are marked confidential or that would normally be considered confidential by a reasonable person under the circumstances. If you receive any such confidential information, you will not disclose it to any third party without our prior written consent. Tribal Blast confidential information does not include information that you independently developed, was rightfully given to you by a third-party without confidentiality obligation, or becomes public through no fault of your own. You may disclose Tribal Blast confidential information when compelled to do so by law if you provide us reasonable prior notice, unless a court orders that we not receive notice.

Publicity

Except as permitted by Tribal Blast, Company will not make any public statements regarding these Business Terms and Company’s relationship to Tribal Blast. Company agrees to cooperate with Tribal Blast in responding to any user, press, or governmental inquiries that either party may receive, in the manner directed by Tribal Blast.

Legal Compliance

Our Business Services are not intended for distribution to or use in any country where such distribution or use would violate local law. We reserve the right to limit our Business Services in any country at any time. Company will comply with all applicable U.S. and non-U.S. export control and trade sanctions laws (“Export Laws”). Company will not, directly or indirectly, export, re-export, provide, or otherwise transfer our Business Services: (a) to any individual, entity, or country prohibited by Export Laws; (b) to any individual or entity, or anyone owned or controlled by any individual or entity, on U.S. or non-U.S. government restricted parties lists; or (c) for any purpose prohibited by Export Laws, including nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons, or missile technology applications, without the required government authorizations. Company will not use or download our Business Services: (i) if it is located, or owned or controlled by anyone located, in a restricted country; (ii) if it is currently listed, or owned or controlled by anyone listed, on any U.S. or non-U.S. restricted parties list; (iii) for the benefit or on behalf of a restricted country or anyone listed on any U.S. or non-U.S. restricted parties list; or (iv) for any purpose prohibited by Export Laws. Company will not disguise its location through IP proxying or other methods.

Governing Law and Venue

The laws of the State of California govern these Business Terms and any Disputes (defined below) that may arise between Tribal Blast and Company, without regard to conflict of law provisions. Company will resolve any Claim that it has with us relating to, arising out of, or in any way in connection with these Business Terms, us, our Business Services, or other products and services we may make available (“Dispute(s)”) exclusively in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California to the extent there is federal jurisdiction, or a state court located in San Mateo County in California, and Company agrees to submit to the personal jurisdiction of such courts for the purpose of litigating all such Disputes.

Amendment

We may amend or update these Business Terms, including all incorporated policies and documents. Changes to these Business Terms become effective upon the date that we publish such changes. Company’s continued use of our Business Services confirms its acceptance of these Business Terms as amended. If Company does not agree to these Business Terms as amended, Company must stop using our Business Services by deleting its account. Please review these Business Terms from time to time.

Assignment

All of our rights and obligations under these Business Terms are freely assignable by us to any of our affiliates or in connection with a merger, acquisition, restructuring, or sale of assets, or by operation of law or otherwise, and we may transfer Company’s information to any of our affiliates, successor entities, or new owner in connection with such a merger, acquisition, restructuring, or sale of assets. Company will not transfer or assign any of its rights or obligations under these Business Terms to anyone else without our prior written consent, and any attempt to do so is void.

Severability

If any provision of these Business Terms is deemed unlawful, void, or for any reason unenforceable, then that provision shall be deemed severable from these Business Terms and shall not affect the validity and enforceability of the remaining provisions.

Miscellaneous

The section titles in these Business Terms are for convenience only and have no legal or contractual effect. Terms such as “including” are to be construed without limitation. Nothing in these Business Terms will prevent us from complying with the law. These Business Terms do not establish any agency, partnership, or joint venture between Company and Tribal Blast. These Business Terms do not give any third-party beneficiary rights. If we fail to enforce any of these Business Terms, it will not be considered a waiver. Unless a mutually executed agreement between Company and us states otherwise, these Business Terms make up the entire agreement between Company and us regarding our Business Services and supersede any prior written or oral agreements.

 

B2B Marketing, Business Processes

Personalizing Customer Experience with Big Data

Back in 1991, I trained in a database marketing boot camp. I worked on American Express (AMEX), managing its Gold Card direct marketing efforts. AmEx, a leader in personalizing printed communications, had created its most successful program when it highlighted in direct mail pieces that someone was a “Member since XXXX.” Yes, membership had its privileges. But for American Express, this personalization triggered a lift.

Show Me What You Got

Now it’s almost 25 years later. And while everyone has been talking about big data — trying to set up the proper infrastructure and human resources to be part of this phenomenon, 2018 will be the year to personalize big data on the screen.

The term personalization has many meanings to many people. For the purposes of this post, I am focusing on “the content on the screen.” Customizing what the user reads and sees will be the challenge, especially because a responsive design approach still requires careful consideration about what is personalized on a tablet versus an iPhone.

Big Data Will be Operationalized

With personalization being a key theme these days, marketers will need to get their hands dirty and truly understand the different categories in their customer database. They need to design their digital platforms with their database in mind, knowing that different areas of the screen can pull in content from both the customer and product database.

For example, Amazon pulls in two different types of data based on my purchase behavior: books on digital marketing, which I am interested in, and children’s videos, which I access every night via their Instant Video. Their customer database might carry just the title name, the author and the price. The assets for that information would be in a product database. The two need to work closely together on the screen.

Every day, Netflix and Amazon demonstrate their ability to leverage this kind of data to talk to their customers on an individual and personal level. Sometimes, I think they could go a step further in personalizing information on the page, especially because one of the big battle grounds these days is same day delivery. Amazon and Walmart can incorporate GPS data to determine potential offline purchases or product drop off points.

Intuit’s 2013 Turbo Tax product offers a nice personalized solutions for its loyal members. It automatically transfers returning customer’s personal information and prior year tax return data, including wage and salary information from their employer, and then adapts itself based on that information to splash screens and questions that are not relevant to their specific tax situation. The company leverages all of the valuable preexisting info that sits in its databases.

Size Doesn’t Matter

Smaller and medium size companies need to take their old school “face-to-face” approach to the next level and personalize more than just ads or emails. They need to personalize at all touch points, including customer service, Skype, Hangouts, etc.

It’s important to remember that having the largest dataset or most sophisticated database will not guarantee an effective personalization program. It requires testing out and knowing what data elements will motivate a customer or partner to take an action.

Getting Under the Hood

Here are simple steps to get you started:

  1. Assume any data element in your customer or product database can be used to personalize information on the screen.
  2. Identify the type of tribes/segments who will visit your site or your app (or call customer service).
  3. Prioritize a list of three calls to action you want each of these segments to take when they use your product/site.
  4. List out the information you want to display on screen.
  5. Map out these info elements for multiple screens (tablets, smartphones, etc.) because you can’t share the same information on a smartphone as you can on a PC.
  6. Confirm these data elements are stored in your database(s) and if not, plan on capturing and storing them.
  7. Work with your designers and programmers to determine how many characters, picture size, etc. you can fit on the page.
  8. Work with your analytics team to set up the proper tracking
  9. Remember: Start simple. You don’t need to personalize each area on the screen.
  10. Also remember, give your marketing team a basic course in database marketing.

Training marketers on how to leverage their customer and product databases will take time. The more they can understand about how data can be pulled from a system and displayed on a screen, the more effective they will be in selling their products and services. This will take time. This will require marketers to get their hands dirty, get under the hood and understand more than the fundamentals of big database marketing. This is true even if they work outside Silicon Valley or Silicon Alley.

The question is: Do they have the desire to acquire this skill set?

Digital Transformation
PIE Methodology

DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION DIALOGUES – PART 2

(Resuming my dialog with transformation expert – and friend – Scott K Wilder). Scott had touched on the challenge an older workforce presents to digital transformation and the need to embrace Millennial Leaders…)

GA: I see this all the time. In fact, I’d venture to suggest that there might be a pretty strong positive correlation between the average age of your workforce and the perceived need for digital transformation. But this seems really hard to change. Good luck attracting young digital talent to a company that skews older AND is poor at digital. I also see challenges in adaptation. I argued that when you select a digital leader for transformation it’s important – even vital – to get someone who isn’t just experienced in cutting edge digital. They need to have experienced the pain of transformation to be effective in that role. But I see potentially similar problems trying to integrate younger employees into your workforce. I could see where they would just get frustrated. Obviously, though, this has to be done. Thoughts on how to smooth this? And thoughts about making an older workforce more digital in a fairly effective manner?

SW: Having younger individuals in your company is important for a true digital transformation. But don’t just hire them because they are less expensive than the older workers. Hire them because of how comfortable they are with technology and their desire to learn.

To smooth things out, first I would focus on what Millennials want in their career and / or what do they want to get out of their work. They have a tremendous desire to learn. Yes, it’s not just about achieving for them. Reminder: Creating a learning culture is an important way to transforming a company.

Therefore, during an interview process or an onboarding process, I would ask them:

– where do they see themselves in a year (none of this three year or five years stuff)

– what skills do they think they need to learn or acquire (maybe you, the hiring manager, help guide them towards an answer by sharing what skills are required for this)

– how can you (their manager support them)

Reminder: Find out their goals and aspirations before they start working

A big mistake companies make is that they never even consider asking these questions.

I would also look beyond the hiring manager or group. I would find a younger employee a mentor, who is outside the group they work in and who is not part of their of their everyday team (even if it is a cross-functional team). I would find someone who can be a good sounding board for the individual. In fact, I would have the person interview 2-3 potential guides or mentors. Let them feel like they are part of the process. Reminder: Assign them a mentor and Don’t just assign everything to a Millennial. (OK, that’s two reminders)

Establish toll-gates or check-ins with the younger employee. Part of creating a learning culture is to have an open and continuous feedback loop. Reminder: Check in with your younger employees even if there’s a manager that separates you and them.!

Younger people today are passionate about causes. So figure out if there’s a way to tie your digital transformation to a higher cause (or even calling). If you are T-Mobile, for example, can you use your technology to help people in less developered countries get better access to telecommunications (Maybe be part of Google or Facebooks’s Internet Satellite projects). Reminder: Define and share your cause!

And somewhat related to the ‘cause’ calling, make sure your company has a clear mission. People, in general, respond better when they know where the company’s True North lies — what the company is trying to accomplish. Final Reminder: If you really want to smooth things out and integrate younger employees into your digital transformation, make them a part of the journey from the beginning.

GA: This is great stuff. I’ve always been a little skeptical of generational theories – but there really are some noticeable differences with Millennials. It’s also, I think, a matter of our times. We talk about Millennials, for example, being passionate about causes – and I’ve certainly seen that. In general, though, I think it’s true more generally these days – not necessarily that people are more passionate about their causes – but that they are more willing to cross work with other things and are less determined to have a work life and a non-work life which never shall meet. When you can get people to bring that extra passion to their work it’s a pretty big win.

But you dodged one aspect of my question (or at least sinned by omission) – what about getting older works more attuned to digital? In some ways, I think that’s a more important and interesting problem…

Data, Uncategorized

Digital Transformation Dialogue (Pt 1 of 5)

Originally published @ Measuring the Digital World with my friend Gary Angel

I’m going to wrap up this extended series on digital transformation with a back-and-forth dialog with an old friend of mine. I’ve known Scott K. Wilder since the early days of Web Analytics. He’s been an industry leader helping companies build communities, adapt to an increasingly social world, and drive digital transformation. In some of this current work, Scott has been working with companies to adopt collaborative working suites for their customers, partners and employees – which I think is a huge part of internal digital transformation. So I thought a conversation on the pitfalls and challenges might be interesting and useful.

GA: We all see these hype-cycle trends and right now there’s a lot of interest in digital transformation at the enterprise level. I think that’s driven by the fact that most large enterprises have tried pretty seriously for a while now to get better at digital and are frustrated with the results. Do you agree?

SW: Good question.

When you read white papers about the latest trends in the enterprise space, most of them highlight the importance of each company being digital transformed. This usually means leaving a legacy approach or operation and instead leveraging a new approach or business model that embraces technology.

Unfortunately, most companies fail when they undertake this endeavor. Sometimes they fail because just pay lip service to this initiative, never do anything beyond placing the goal of ‘going digital’ on a powerpoint slide they give a company All-Hands (I have witnessed this first hand). And sometimes, they just test out bunch of different programs without thinking through desired outcomes. (They throw a lot of virtual stuff against the internet wall hoping that something sticks).

Undergoing a Digital Transformation means many things to many people. It can imply focusing more on the customer. Or it can mean enabling employees collaborate better together. At the end of the day, however, a company needs to first focus on one simple end state. One change in behavior! Rather than trying to boil the whole ocean at once and try to do implement massive digital transformation across an organization, it’s better to start with a  simple project, try to leverage technology to accomplish a desired outcome, learn from the experience and then share the success with other parts of the organization

Start first with a relatively simple goal. And if you really want to change an organization, see if you can get employees volunteer to be your soldiers in arms and then closely work with them to define what digital success looks like. It could be as something getting employees to digitalize their interaction with each other more  or leveraging technology to improve a VOC process. Whatever it is. Start with one project.

Here’s one approach. Once the goal is to define, then ask for volunteers to work on figuring out how to achieve the desired outcome. No digital program or initiative is going to be successful without employee buy – in and involvement, so it behooves CEOs to find a bunch of enthusiastic volunteers to figure out the ‘how’ (If you remember you calculus Y = (x)Senior managers can decide on the Y, and then let their team figure out the X or inputs.

Digital Transformations often fail because:

  • Executives often decide their company goals and then impose their approach on the employees. Digital Transformation initiatives also fail because CEOs want to change whole culture overnight. Unfortunately, however, they often forget Rome was not built in day. Even though a true Digital Transformation is often a journey, it is also important to start simple. Very simple!
  • There’s no buy in at the mid-level ranks in the company
  • There’s no True North or desired goal
  • There’s too much attention on the technology and not the cultural impact.

I have read articles that tell you true cultural change can only happen if you eliminate political infighting, distribute your decision making, etc. While all of that is important, it will require gutting your organization, laying off a lot of people and hand-picking new hires if you want to change things quickly.

To truly change a culture, however start simple. Pick a goal. Ask for employees to volunteer to work on it (take other work off their plate so they don’t have to work after house). Ask them to to involve leveraging digital technologies. Give the team room to succeed or fail.  Most importantly, be their guide along the way.

Once this small team completes their project, celebrate their success in front of others in the company. Have them highlight how they leveraged technology.

Once this group is successful, anoint each team member to be a digital transformation ambassador and have them then move into other groups of the organization and share their learnings, experiences, etc.

GA: I’m a big believer in the idea that to change culture you have to change behavior – that means doing things not talking about them. I like the idea of a targeted approach – huge organizational changes are obviously incredibly risky. That being said, I feel like most of what you’ve talked about could be applied to any kind of transformation project – digital or otherwise. I’m not disagreeing with that, but I’m curious if you agree that digital presents some unique challenges to the large enterprise. And if you do agree, what are those challenges and do they change/drive any aspects of a transformation strategy?

SW: There are definitely challenges in driving any type of transformative change in an enterprise environment. Here’s a list of challenges preventing a smooth adoption of digital technologies or hindering the ability to digitally transform an organization

As they say. It’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Companies get stuck in their old ways of doing things. For example, even though companies are testing the waters with Slack and Hipchat, two great collaborative platforms, few have made any progress in being weaned (a bit) off of email. For example, we all complain about email but refuse to reduce how often we use it). Part of the problem is the result is that those individuals, who are tasked with driving change in the organization actually tend to be the biggest resisters to change. The IT department, who I will pick on here, usually are decision makers and keepers of the digital platform budgets do not want to try something new. (Marketing is slowly getting more say here, but most marketing leads don’t understand new technologies). So IT and even Marketing wait as long as possible to make a decision about adopting newer collaborative technologies, such as Slack or Hipchat. And while they are doing an elaborate evaluation process, today’s tech savvy staff often just jumps in and starts using the latest and greatest technologies. They don’t ask for permission first. This was the case at Marketo with Slack. First, a small group of employees starting using it and soon others jumped in. There was resistance at the highest parts of the company. Eventually, IT, however had no choice and how to follow the wisdom of the crowd. Survey Monkey also started out this way. There are other challenges as well. Solution: Companies need do a better job at knowing understanding what tools their teams want to use and why they want to use them. If the troops are using Google Docs, for example, management needs to embrace this and not try and force their way (in this case, the Microsoft Office 365 way) down the throats of their employees. If there are security concerns, figure out a solution.

GA: I’ll just note that in many ways this reflects my discussion of a Reverse Hierarchy of Understanding in organizations

…What else?

SW:   Data and Privacy Issues: Companies, rightly so, are always concerned about data leakage, data security and privacy issues. Enterprises, especially the public ones and the ones in important transaction industries like Finance or Health Care, have to be sensitive to how data is shared within an organization. Solution: If an organization wants to adopt a newer technology, management needs to do more research in how other companies adopt newer technology while protecting their company secrets. Few companies develop breakthrough technologies and systems that they are the first to try something new. Probably someone has already created a similar service or implemented a similar technology. They have probably already dealt with similar issues. I am not saying just copy what they did but rather learn from their mistakes. Or what they did well.

An older workforce: A third challenge is that many enterprises attract an older workforce and/or are not sure how to integrate millennials into their organization. As I pointed out in my book, Millennial Leaders, it’s important to embrace a younger workforce and place these individuals on teams where they can help advise key decision makers. Younger employees are more likely to adopt new approaches, new technologies and new ways of doing things. Solution: Bring millennials into digital related conversations sooner than later. While decision making can still be top down, it’s important to give these younger folks a voice.

GA: Okay – I know you have more thoughts on this but I’m going to stop right there because I know you’re an expert on this Millennial stuff and I want to delve into it a bit. But that’s probably a discussion for Post #2…

Big Data
B2B Marketing, Blog, Data

Personalizing Customer Experience with Big Data

Back in 1991, I trained in a database marketing boot camp. I worked on American Express (AMEX), managing it’s Gold Card direct marketing efforts. AmEx, a leader in personalizing printed communications, had created its most successful program when it highlighted in direct mail pieces that someone was a “Member since XXXX.” Yes, membership had its privileges. But for American Express, this personalization triggered a lift.

Show Me What You Got

Now it’s over 20 years later. And while 2013 was the year of big data in the back office where companies tried to set up the proper infrastructure and human resources to be part of this phenomenon, 2014 will be the year to personalize big data on the screen.

The term personalization has many meanings to many people. For the purposes of this post, I am focusing on “the content on the screen.” Customizing what the user reads and sees will be the challenge, especially because a responsive design approach still requires careful consideration about what is personalized on a tablet versus an iPhone.

Big Data Will be Operationalized

With personalization being a key theme in 2014, marketers will need to get their hands dirty and truly understand the different categories in their customer database. They need to design their digital platforms with their database in mind, knowing that different areas of the screen can pull in content from both the customer and product database.

For example, Amazon pulls in two different types of data based on my purchase behavior: books on digital marketing, which I am interested in, and children’s videos, which I access every night via their Instant Video. Their customer database might carry just the title name, the author and the price. The assets for that information would be in a product database. The two need to work closely together on the screen.

Every day, Netflix and Amazon demonstrate their ability to leverage this kind of data to talk to their customers on an individual and personal level. Sometimes, I think they could go a step further in personalizing information on the page, especially because one of the big battle grounds in 2014 will be same day delivery. Amazon and Walmart can incorporate GPS data to determine potential offline purchases or product drop off points.

Intuit’s 2013 Turbo Tax product offers a nice personalized solutions for its loyal members. It automatically transfers returning customer’s personal information and prior year tax return data, including wage and salary information from their employer, and then adapts itself based on that information to splash screens and questions that are not relevant to their specific tax situation. The company leverages all of the valuable preexisting info that sits in its databases.

Size Doesn’t Matter

Smaller and medium size companies need to take their old school “face-to-face” approach to the next level and personalize more than just ads or emails. They need to personalize at all touch points, including customer service, Skype, Hangouts, etc.

It’s important to remember that having the largest dataset or most sophisticated database will not guarantee an effective personalization program. It requires testing out and knowing what data elements will motivate a customer or partner to take an action.

Getting Under the Hood

Here are simple steps to get you started:

  1. Assume any data element in your customer or product database can be used to personalize information on the screen.
  2. Identify the type of tribes/segments who will visit your site or your app (or call customer service).
  3. Prioritize a list of three calls to action you want each of these segments to take when they use your product/site.
  4. List out the information you want to display on screen.
  5. Map out these info elements for multiple screens (tablets, smartphones, etc.) because you can’t share the same information on a smartphone as you can on a PC.
  6. Confirm these data elements are stored in your database(s) and if not, plan on capturing and storing them.
  7. Work with your designers and programmers to determine how many characters, picture size, etc. you can fit on the page.
  8. Work with your analytics team to set up the proper tracking
  9. Remember: Start simple. You don’t need to personalize each area on the screen.
  10. Also remember, give your marketing team a basic course in database marketing.

Training marketers on how to leverage their customer and product databases will take time. The more they can understand about how data can be pulled from a system and displayed on a screen, the more effective they will be in selling their products and services. This will take time. This will require marketers to get their hands dirty, get under the hood and understand more than the fundamentals of big database marketing. This is true even if they work outside Silicon Valley or Silicon Alley.

The question is: Do they have the desire to acquire this skill set?

Note: Originally published in CMSWire.